Deep Sky Observations with eVscope May/June 2020

Conditions | Observation Overview | List of Observed Sky Objects | References

Since the end of January 2020, I own an Unistellar eVscope telescope for observing and taking photos of deep sky objects. On this page, I collect information about first observations from May 2020 to June 12, 2020, which might be of interest to other beginners. The photos that were taken during the observations are shown elsewhere on this site:

Note: I present the first five observation sessions, including photos, on page Unistellar eVscope - Observations.

In this phase, I visited (and documented here...) the following deep sky objects with the Unistellar eVscope (in alphabetical order):

Conditions

Sky Region and Objects

In May 2020 (up to June 12), I observed various sky areas. A map therefore does not make much sense here...

Observation Time

The observations in this phase started at the beginning of May 2020. They typically took place shortly after dusk (after 10 p.m., later even after 11 p.m.), when it was sufficiently dark for a successful star alignment.

Observation Location

Most observations took place in Mühlhausen/Kraichgau (Germany):

Some observations also took place in Erkerode near Braunschweig (Germany):

Equipment Used

When observing with the eVscope, I only needed the eVscope and my iPhone. I also used my laptop for running SkySafari (for DSO) and Stellarium (for coordinates) in parallel to the observations.

General Conditions

In general, the sky above Mühlhausen/Kraichgau is "light-polluted" and does not invite you to search for deep sky objects. For astro photography, however, light pollution is not as disturbing as for visual observations. In Erkerode the sky is a little darker, but trees and obstructions disturbed the observations.

 

Observation Overview

Observation Dates

Date
2020
Observed Objects Observed Objects, Details Remarks Further Remarks
May 5 G: M 63, M 81, M 82, M 101, M 106, M 108, NGC 3877
PN: M 97
Moon
Order (from about 10 p.m.): M 97, M 108, M 82, M 81, M 106, M 101, NGC 3877, M 63; moon; M 51 could not be observed because it was too close to the zenith Nearly full moon New app version 1.0.3; M 97 was a Unistellar task
May 10 OC: M 37 M 37; very hard to observe and photograph (probably only "Live View" mode) 3 days after full moon, M 37 too low M 37 was a Unistellar task
May 15

KS: M 3, M 5
G: M 61 (mit SN 2020jfo), M 64, M 94, M 104

Order: M 61 mit Supernova 2020jfo, M 104, M 3, M 5, M 64, M 94 (and some misses: NGC 5466, NGC 5053, M 51) After waning half moon; sky was initially rather bright M 61 with SN 2020jfo was a Unistellar task
May 16 GC: M 13, M 92, NGC 6229
G: M 65, M 66, M 96
Order: M 65/66, M 96, M 13, M 92, NGC 6229 (searched in vain for NGC 5053, 5466 with SkySafari coordinates) Observed from 10:20 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.; sky was initially rather bright Hercules high up in the east...
May 17 GC: M 53, NGC 4725 (+ NGC 4712), NGC 5053, NGC 5466 Order: M 53, NGC 4725 (with NGC 4712), NGC 5053, NGC 5466 Observed from 10:30 p.m. to 11:50 p.m.; sky was initially rather bright  
May 21
Erkerode
GC: M 5, M 10, M 12, M 14, M 53, M 107
G: M 64, M 85, NGC 4559, NGC 4565, NGC 4631
Order: M 53, M 64, NGC 4565, NGC 4559, NGC 4631, M 85, M 5, M 12, M 10, M 107, M 14 Observed from 11:00 p.m. to 0:30 a.m.; sky was initially rather bright; new moon  
May 24
Erkerode
G: M 51, M 63 Order: M 63, M 51 Observed from 11:15 p.m. to 11:30 p.m; clouds came and disturbed M 51, and maybe even M 63 M 63 was a Unistellar task
May 29
Erkerode
GC: M 4, M 5, M 9, M 10, M 12, M 13, M 14, M 19, M 22, M 28, M 62, M 80, NGC 5634, NGC 6366, NGC 6535
OC: M 6, M 11, M 18, M 21, M 23?, M 25, M 26
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20
PN: IC 4593, NGC 6210, NGC 6572
SC: M 24
Order: M 19, M 9, (M 62 n.f.,) M 80 poor, M 4 fair, M 5, NGC 5634, IC 4593 (White Eyed Pea Nebula), NGC 6210 (Turtle Nebula), NGC 6366 (Pos), NGC 6535 (*Pos), NGC 6572 (Blue Raquetball Nebula), M 12, M 10, M 14, NGC 6366 (*Pos, repeated), M 22, M 28, M 17 (Omega/Swan Nebula), M 18, M 16 (Eagle Nebula), M 25, M 20 (Trifid Nebula), M 8 (Lagoon Nebula), M 21 poor, (M 23 n.f.,) M 24 (Small Sagittarius Cloud), M 11 (Wild Duck Cluster), M 26, M 19 (repeated), M 6, M 62, M 4, M 80, M 13 (n.f. in a further attempt)

Pos: I had to enter position data; Stellarium is better than SkySafari with respect to the position data.

Observed from 11:15 p.m. to nearly 2 a.m.; some objects were very low at the horizon or disturbed by trees.  
May 31
Erkerode
GC: IC 1276, M 3, M 5, M 13, M 14, M 107, NGC 5897, NGC 6366, NGC 6517, NGC 6535, NGC 6539, NGC 6712
OC: Cr 350, IC 4665, IC 4756, M 11, M 23, M 25, M 26, NGC 6633,
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20
PN: NGC 6210, NGC 6537, NGC 6567, NGC 6572
SC: M 24
Order: M 3, M 5, NGC 5897, M 107, NGC 6366, M 14, NGC 6517, NGC 6539, IC 1276, NGC 6535, Cr 350, IC 4665, NGC 6572, NGC 6633, IC 4756, M 11, M 26, NGC 6712, M 25, M 23, M 24, NGC 6567, NGC 6537, M 13, NGC 6210, M 16 (Eagle Nebula), M 17 (Omega/Swan Nebula), M 20 (Trifid Nebula), M 8 (Lagoon Nebula) Observed from 11:20 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; some objects very low or disturbed by trees  
Jun 1
Erkerode
GC: IC 1276, M 9, M 14, M 19, M 28, NGC 6235, NGC 6284, NGC 6287, NGC 6293, NGC 6342, NGC 6356, NGC 6366, NGC 6440, NGC 6517, NGC 6539
OC: M 23
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20
PN: IC 4634, NGC 6445, NGC 6537
Order: M 19, NGC 6293, NGC 6284, NGC 6287, IC 4634 (Rose Nebula), NGC 6235, NGC 6342, M 9, NGC 6356, NGC 6366, M 14, NGC 6517, NGC 6539, IC 1276, M 23, NGC 6445 (Little Gem Nebula/Box Nebula), NGC 6440, NGC 6537 (Red Spider Nebula) , M 8 (Lagoon Nebula), M 16 (Eagle Nebula), M 17 (Omega/Swan Nebula), M 20 (Trifid Nebula), M 28 Observed from 11:20 to 1:15 a.m.;some objects very low or disturbed by trees  
Jun 7 GC: M 53 M 53 Observed from 11:00 p.m. to 0:45 a.m.; somewhat disturbed by clouds M 53 was a Unistellar task
Jun 11 KS: M 5, M 9, M 10, M 12, M 13, M 14, M 56, M 92, M 107
OS: M 11, M 26
G: M 51, M 101
GN: M 16, M 17
PN: M 27, M 57
Order: M 3 (poor), M 51, M 92, M 13, M 101 (, M 57 (Ring Nebula), M 56, M 27 (Dumbbell Nebula), M 12, M 5, M 10, M 14, M 9, M 107, M 11, M 26, M 16 (Eagle Nebula), M 17 (Omega/Swan Nebula) Observed from 10:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. M 16 was a Unistellar task from June 12 on...
Jun 12 KS: M 3, M 5, M 56
OS; M 29, M 39
G: IC 2574, M 51, M 81, M 82, M 101, M 102, M 106, M 108, M 109, NGC 4236
GN: NGC 7000
PN: M 27, M 57, M 97, NGC 6826

Order: M 3, M 5, M 57, NGC 6826, M 81, M 82, NGC 4236 (very faint, not really visible), IC 2574 (very faint, not really visible), M 102, M 101, M 51, M 106, M 109, M 108, M 97, M 27 (disturbed), M 56, M 29, M 39, NGC 7000 (too large)

 

Observed from 11:00 p.m. to 1:15 a.m. NGC 4236 und IC 2574 very, very faint and more or less invisible ; NGC 7000 too large for recognizing anything (only characteristic background stars)

Bold: First observation during this observation period; G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GN = galactic nebula, PN = planetary nebula, P = star pattern, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, SN = supernova, SC = star cloud

 

List of Observed Sky Objects

Object details can be obtained via the links to the relevant deep sky objects.

DSO Details
Name Constellation Type Remarks
Cr 350   Ophiuchus OC Very large and sparse star cluster; it is not concentrated and not well seprated from its background; too large for the eVscope.
IC 1276   Serpens GC Appears with a reddish tint because of its large distance and the dust of the Milky Way.
IC 2574 Coddington Galaxy Ursa Major G This time very faint, practically not recognizable
IC 4593 White Eyed Pea Nebula Hercules PN Is turquoise and has a bright core, which cannot be recognized in the eVscope.
IC 4634 Rose Nebula Ophiuchus PN Has a point-symmetric, s-shaped structure, but is so tiny that none of this can be detected in the eVscope; the nebula itself is difficult to find, but in the end, the colour helps.
IC 4665   Ophiuchus OC Can already be seen with the naked eye as a faint glow; too large to be seen well in the eVscope.
IC 4756   Serpens OC Consists of few, inconspicuously scattered stars and is rather an object for opera glasses or binoculars; for the eVscope, too large.
M 3   Canes Venatici GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 4   Scorpius GC From Central Europe the most resolvable globular cluster, but difficult to observe because it is located far south.
M 5   Serpens Cauda GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones, larger than M 3
M 6 Butterfly Cluster Scorpius OC Forms a cluster duo with M 7, but not in the eVscope...
M 8 Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius GN Emission nebula (NGC 6523) and open star cluster (NGC 6530)
M 9   Ophiuchus GC Small globular star cluster
M 10   Ophiuchus GC Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 12
M 11 Wild Duck Cluster Scutum OC Is located in the Scutum cloud, a special section of the Milky Way; therefore the photos are full of stars.; therefore the photos are full of stars.
M 12   Ophiuchus GC Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 10
M 13   Hercules GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 14   Ophiuchus GC The third of the three bright globular star clusters in Ophiuchus, but different in character from M 10 und M 12.
M 16 Eagle Nebula Serpens GN Star cluster M 16 embedded in the Eagle Nebula IC 4703
M 17 Omega/Swan Nebula Sagittarius GN One of the most beautiful emission nebulae; in the reversiong telescope, some people recognize a swan...
M 18   Sagittarius OC More a less a "sub par" star cluster
M 19   Ophiuchus GC Famous for its oval shape
M 20 Trifid Nebula Sagittarius GN Is called Trifid Nebula because it consists of three parts.
M 21   Sagittarius OC Open star cluster that is given little attention to
M 22   Sagittarius GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 23   Sagittarius OC Large open star cluster (nearly moon size)
M 24 Small Sagittarius Cloud Sagittarius SC Part of the Milky Way, too large for the eVscope
M 25   Sagittarius OC A "classical object for binoculars"
M 26   Scutum OC One of the more inconspicuous star clusters
M 27 Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula PN Somewhat faint, but nice
M 28   Sagittarius GC Smaller than the nearby M 22
M 29   Cygnus OC Pattern created from a few stars
M 37   Auriga OC Nice, very dense open star cluster; was a Unistellar task
M 39   Cygnus OC Few stars
M 51 Whirlpool Galaxy Canes Venatici G Nice spiral galaxy with connected satellite galaxy; sky cloudy this time; was a Unistellar task.
M 53   Coma Berenices GC One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 56   Lyra GC One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 57 Ring Nebula Lyra GN Ring nice to see
M 61 with SN 2020jfo Virgo G Spiral galaxy, small and fine spiral in the eVscope; on May 6, 2020, the new supernova SN 2020jfo within it was discovered; was a Unistellar task.
M 62   Ophiuchus GC Is located near the horizon, therefore hard to observe
M 63 Sunflower Galaxy Canes Venatici G Nice, elongated spiral galaxy, somewhat larger
M 64   Coma Berenices G Impressive spiral galaxy with unique look, somewhat larger
M 65   Leo G Thin, elongated spiral galaxy, spiral hard to see; part of the Leo triplet (with M 66 and NGC 3623); with M 66 in the rectangular field of view of the eVscope
M 66   Leo G Elongated spiral galaxy, spiral visible; part of the Leo triplet (with M 65 and NGC 3628); with M 65 in the rectangular field of view of the eVscope
M 80   Scorpius GC One of the fainter globular cluster, but nevertheless worthwhile; located almost as southernly as M 4.
M 81 Bode Galaxy Ursa Major G Nice spiral galaxy; the spiral is not very conspicuous in the eVscope
M 82 Cigar Galaxy Ursa Major G Elongated irregular galaxy (cigar), dirsturbed by an encounter with M 81
M 85 with NGC 4394 Coma Berenices G Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with the galaxy NGC 4394 in the same field of view of the eVscope
M 92   Hercules GC Nice globular star cluster, smaller than M 13, but brighter core
M 94   Canes Venatici G Small spiral galaxy, the spiral appears more like a nebula
M 96   Virgo G Spiral galaxy, forms a pair with M 95, but too far away for the eVscope (40').
M 97   Ursa Major PN Small green dot with two dark spots; was a Unistellar task
M 101 Pinwheel Galaxy Ursa Major G Spiral galaxy, seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 100, but much larger than both; quite impressive in the eVscope
M 102 Spindle Galaxy Draco G  
M 104 Sombrero Galaxy Virgo G Spiral galaxy, seen nearly edge-on; the dust ring and the bright nucleus led to the name; very impressive in the eVscope.
M 106   Canes Venatici G Larger and bright spiral galaxy with bright core
M 107   Ophiuchus GC The faintest of the Messier globular star clusters in constellation Ophiuchus, is located fairly southernly
M 108   Ursa Major G Barred spiral galaxy, nearly seen edge-on
M 109   Ursa Major G Barred spiral galaxy
NGC 3877   Ursa Major G Spiral galaxy, nearly seen edge-on
NGC 4236   Draco G Spiral galaxy; very faint
NGC 4559   Coma Berenices

G

Spiral galaxy
NGC 4565 Needle Galaxy Coma Berenices G One of the most prominent and famous edge-on spiral galaxies in the sky
NGC 4631 Whale Galaxy, with NGC 4627 Virgo G Spiral galaxy seen edge-on; above it, there is a compagnion, the elliptical dwarf galaxy NGC 4627.
NGC 4725 with NGC 4712 Coma Berenices G Small spiral galaxy with even smaller neighbor galaxy NGC 4712 (spiral galaxy)
NGC 5053   Coma Berenices GC Very loose globular star cluster near M 53 (1°)
NGC 5466   Bootes GC Rather loose globular star cluster
NGC 5634   Virgo GC The only globular star cluster in the constellation Virgo; small in the eVscope
NGC 5897   Libra GC Extremely loose structure, only a very low star density even at the center
NGC 6210 Turtle Nebula Hercules PN Rather bright; has a white central star, which is regarded as easy to observe (not in eVscope).
NGC 6229   Hercules GC Small
NGC 6235   Ophiuchus GC Rather small and little compressed
NGC 6284   Ophiuchus GC Rather small
NGC 6287   Ophiuchus GC Small
NGC 6293   Ophiuchus GC Small, but larger than its neighbors
NGC 6342   Ophiuchus GC Rather small
NGC 6356   Ophiuchus GC Small, but larger than its neighbors
NGC 6366   Ophiuchus GC Rather faint, but fairly large and loose
NGC 6440   Sagittarius GC Small
NGC 6445 Little Gem Nebula/Box Nebula Sagittarius PN Very small in the eVscope
NGC 6517   Ophiuchus GC Small, has some star chains in its neighborhood
NGC 6535   Serpens GC Small
NGC 6537 Red Spider Nebula Sagittarius PN Very small, has a white dwarf at its center
NGC 6539   Serpens GC Somewhat larger, has some star chains in its neighborhood
NGC 6567   Sagittarius PN Very small
NGC 6572 Blue Raquetball Nebula Ophiuchus PN Small and cyan
NGC 6633   Ophiuchus OC According to Stoyan on par with M 11 and M 16
NGC 6712   Scutum GC Somewhat larger and nice
NGC 6826 Blinking Planetary Nebula Cygnus PN Bluish spot...
NGC 7000 North America Nebula Cygnus GN Much too large for the eVscope; can only be verified using characteristic stars

G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GE = galactic emission nebula, GR = galactic reflection nebula, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, PN = planetary nebula, SP = star pattern, HII = HII region (emission nebula in other galaxies), SC = star cloud

 

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04.07.2020