Deep Sky Observations with eVscope July/August 2020

Conditions | Observation Overview | List of Observed Sky Objects | References

Since the end of January 2020, I own an Unistellar eVscope telescope for observing and taking photos of deep sky objects. On this page, I collect information about observations from July/August 2020, which might be of interest to other beginners. The photos that were taken during the observations are shown elsewhere on this site.

In this phase, I visited (and documented here...) the following deep sky objects with the Unistellar eVscope (in alphabetical order)

Notes:

 

Conditions

Sky Region and Objects

In July/August 2020, I observed mostly the following sky area (some observed objects are indicated):

Click the map for a larger version - it opens in a new window (Image Courtesy of SkySafari Astronomy, www.simulationcurriculum.com)

Observation Time

The observations in this phase started at the beginning of July 2020. They typically took place shortly after dusk (after 11 p.m.), when it was sufficiently dark for a successful star alignment.

Observation Location

Most observations took place in Mühlhausen/Kraichgau (Germany):

One observation also took place in Ulm (Germany):

Equipment Used

When observing with the eVscope, I only needed the eVscope and my iPhone. I also used my laptop for running SkySafari (for DSO) and Stellarium (for coordinates) in parallel to the observations.

General Conditions

In general, the sky above Mühlhausen/Kraichgau is "light-polluted" and does not invite you to search for deep sky objects. For astro photography, however, light pollution is not as disturbing as for visual observations. In Ulm, the sky is a even brighter (mag 20).

 

Observation Overview

Observation Dates

Date
2020
Observed Objects Observed Objects, Details Remarks Further Remarks
Jul 3
MH
GC: M 3, M 5, M 13, M 56, M 92
G: M 51, M 81, M 82, M 101
PN: M 57
Order (from about 11 p.m.): M 51 (poor), M 3, M 5, M 3, M 51, M 101, M 57, M 56, M 13, M 92, M 81, M 82 More than half moon New app version 1.0.6
Jul 9
Ulm
GC: M 10, M 13
OC: M 11, M 18
G: M 51, M 101
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20
PN: M 57, M 27
Order (from about 11 p.m.): M 13, M 57, M 27, M 20, M 16, M 17, M 8, M 10, M 18, M 11, M 51, M 101 Demonstration of the eVscope for my brother and his wife With two iPads as observers

Jul 18
MH

GC: M 10, M 12, M 14
OC: IC 4665
G: M 51, M 85 (2020nlb)
PN: M 57, M 97
Order (from about 11:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.): M 85 (with new supernova 2020nlb; discovered on June 25, 2020), M 51, M 101, M 97, M 57, M 14, M 10, M 12, IC 4665

Observed primarily top find M 85 with the new supernova 2020nlb. Regrettably, M 85 was already very low at the horizon at 11:30 p.m. With one iPad as observer

Aug 8
MH

GC: M 53
OC: M 11, M 23, M 25
G: M 51, M 101, M 102
GN: M 16, M 17
SC: M 24
K: C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE)
Order (from 10:15 p.m. to 0.15 a.m.): M 53 (fuzzy), C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) (somewhat fuzzy), M 53 (fuzzy), M 51 (fuzzy), M 101 (fuzzy), M 102 (fuzzy, then focus corrected), M 11, M 24, M 23, M 25, M 17, M 16 (mostly OC M 16 seen, barely GN IC 4703)

Primarily, to observe comet NEOWISE together with M 53 (too far apart...); then I observed some objects in the summer milky way. Regrettably, the eVscope was misfocused at the beginning; only when observing M 102, I corrected the focus.

With one iPad as observer
Aug 9
MH
GC: M 3, M 5, M 7, M 22, M 28, M 54, M 69, M 70, M 71, NGC 6934
OC: M 6, M 26
G: NGC 6822
GN: M 27, M 57
PN: NGC 6818
Order (from 10:15 p.m. to 0:10 a.m.): M 22 (disturbed), M 28, M 22, M 7 (slightly disturbed), M 6 (slightly disturbed), M 69, M 70, M 54, Jupiter, M 26, NGC 6934, NGC 6818, NGC 6822, M 71, M 27, M 57, M 3, M 5 Observed mainly to find objects low at the horizon in constellation Sagittarius and further East. With one iPhone as observer (started with iPad)
Aug 19
MH
GC: M 2, M 13, M 15, M 71, M 92
G: M 51, M 101, NGC 6822
GN: NGC 6960, NGC 7000
PN: M 27, NGC 7009
Jupiter, Saturn
Order (from 9:45 p.m. to nearly 12:00 p.m.): Jupiter (live view, after manual adjustment, three moons were visible, but no stripes), Saturn (live view, after man. adj. nice, but wobbly), NGC 7009 (Saturn Nebula; nothing), M 27 (Dumbbell Nebula; quite good); NGC 6822 (Barnard's Galaxy; nothing), M 15 (disturbed, smaller than expected), M 71, NGC 6960 (Western Veil Nebula, nothing), M 2 (blown out at the center, then adj.man.); M 15 (better this time, adj. man.), M 13 (nice, automatic), M 92, M 51 (Whirlpool Galaxy), M 101 (Pinwheel Galaxy), NGC 7000 (North America Nebula; nothing), NGC 7009 (Saturn Nebula; now visible)

  With one iPhone as observer

Aug 20
MH

GC: M 72, M 75, NGC 6934, NGC 7006
OC: M 29, M 73, NGC 6882
G: NGC 6822
GN: IC 1396, IC 5070, IC 6445, NGC 6960, NGC 6995, NGC 7000
PN: M 27, NGC 6818, NGC 7009
Jupiter, Saturn, Pluto?

Order (10:00 p.m. until 00:45 a.m.): Jupiter, Saturn: OK; Pluto: open
M 75 (center too bright, manually also not good), M 72, M 73, NGC 7006, M 75 (better), NGC 6822 (Barnard's Galaxy;seen well at the end), NGC 6818 (Little Gem Nebula; nice), NGC 7009 (Saturn Nebula; nice), NGC 6934 (OK), NGC 6960 (Western Veil Nebula; very faint), NGC 6995 (Eastern Veil Nebula; better), IC 5070 (Pelican Nebula; quite OK), IC 1396 (Elephant Trunk; nothing), IC 7000 (North America Nebula), NGC 6888 (Crescent Nebula), M 29, NGC 6882 (OC), NGC 6905 (Blue Flash Nebula), M 27 (Dumbbell Nebula)

  With one iPhone as observer
Aug 22
MH
OS: M 11, M 26
GN: M 8, M 16
PN: NGC 6741
Jupiter, Saturn, Mond
Order (9:50 p.m. until 11:20 p.m.): Mond, Jupiter, M 26, NGC 6741 Phantom Streak Nebula (nicht zu erkennen), M 11, M 16 (Kampf mit den Wolken), M 8 (Wolken), Saturn (Wolken, Zufallsbilder...) Beobachtungen bis M 16 unscharf trotz Bahtinov-Maske; danach auf Spikes von Sternen scharf gestellt, das war besser... >> Insgesamt später viele Wolken und keine verwertbaren Fotos... With one iPhone as observer
Aug 23
MH

GC: M 9
OC: M 11, M 18, M 21, M 23, M 25, M 26
G: NGC 7317, NGC 7479
GN: M 8, M 16, M 17, M 20, IC 5070, IC 5146, NGC 6888, NGC 6960, NGC 6995
PN: NGC 6445, NGC 6741
SC: M 24

Order (9:55 p.m. until 00:05 a.m.): M 13, M 26, M 11 (Wild Duck Cluster), NGC 6741 (Phantom Streak Nebula), M 16 (Eagle Nebula; aborted two times after 2-3 min), M 17 (Omega/Swan Nebula; aborted after about 1 min once), M 18, M 24 (aborted once after 28 sec), M 25, M 23, NGC 6445 (Little Gem/Crescent Nebula), M 9, M 21, M 20 (Trifid Nebula; manually better), M 8 (Lagoon Nebula), NGC 6888 (Crescent Nebula), NGC 6960 (Western Veil Nebula), NGC 6995 (Eastern Veil Nebula), IC 5070 (Pelican Nebula), IC 5146 (Cocoon Nebula), NGC 7317 (Stephan's Quintet), NGC 7479 (Superman Galaxy)

Fairly dark sky even though the crescent moon was present at the beginning

With one iPhone as observer
Aug 24
MH
GC: M 2, M 15, M 22, M 56, M 71
OC: M 39, M 52, NGC 6823, NGC 7243
G: M 31, M 32, M 110, NGC 7317, NGC 7331, NGC 7479
GN: IC 5146, NGC 6820
PN: M 27, M 57, NGC 7009
Order (10:15 p.m. until 00:45 a.m.): NGC 281, NGC 7479, NGC 7317, NGC 7331, M 15, M 22, NGC 6823/6820 (coord.), IC 5146, M 39, NGC 7243, M 52, NGC 7009, M 2, M 56, M 57, M 71, M 27, M 2, M 31, M 32, M 110 Fairly dark sky even though the crescent moon was present at the beginning With one iPhone as observer
Aug 25
MH
GC: M 13, M 92
G: NGC 6946
GN: M 16
PN: M 27, M 57, NGC 6543
Jupiter, Saturn
Order (10:10 p.m. until 11:30 p.m.): M 57, NGC 6946 (Fireworks Galaxy), NGC 6543 (Cat's Eye Nebula), M 27 (Dumbbell Nebula), M 92, M 13, M 16 (Eagle Nebula), Saturn, Jupiter, Saturn At the end, clouds appeared and covered up everything. With one iPhone as observer

Bold: First observation during this observation period; G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GN = galactic nebula, PN = planetary nebula, P = star pattern, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, SN = supernova, SC = star cloud

 

List of Observed Sky Objects

Object details can be obtained via the links to the relevant deep sky objects.

DSO Details
Name Constellation Type Remarks
C/2020 F3 NEOWISE --- C A nice comet, but too late in the year for better photos...
IC 1396 Elephant Trunk Cepheus GE Practically not visible as a nebula...
IC 4665   Ophiuchus OC Can already be seen with the naked eye as a faint glow; too large to be seen well in the eVscope.
IC 5070 Pelican Nebula Cygnus GE Large reddish nebula, can be guessed without post-processing...
IC 5146 Cocoon Nebula Cygnus GE Small reddish nebula with embedded open star cluster Cr 470
M 2   Aquarius GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 3   Canes Venatici GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 5   Serpens Cauda GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones, larger than M 3
M 6 Butterfly Cluster Scorpius OC Forms a cluster duo with M 7, but not in the eVscope...
M 7 Ptolemy's Cluster Scorpius OC Forms a cluster duo with M 6, but not in the eVscope... Regrettably only photographed "disturbed" up to now...
M 8 Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius GN Emission nebula (NGC 6523) and open star cluster (NGC 6530)
M 9   Ophiuchus GC Fairly small and concentred towards the center
M 10   Ophiuchus GC Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 12
M 11 Wild Duck Cluster Scutum OC Is located in the Scutum cloud, a special section of the Milky Way; therefore the photos are full of stars.; therefore the photos are full of stars.
M 12   Ophiuchus GC Forms a pair with the globular star cluster M 10
M 13   Hercules GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 14   Ophiuchus GC The third of the three bright globular star clusters in Ophiuchus, but different in character from M 10 und M 12.
M 15   Pegasus GC Supposedly, it is the best globular cluster in autumn.
M 16 Eagle Nebula Serpens GN Star cluster M 16 embedded in the Eagle Nebula IC 4703
M 17 Omega/Swan Nebula Sagittarius GN One of the most beautiful emission nebulae; in the reversiong telescope, some people recognize a swan...
M 18   Sagittarius OC More a less a "sub par" star cluster
M 20 Trifid Nebula Sagittarius GN Is called Trifid Nebula because it consists of three parts.
M 21     OS To Stoyan, M 21 is attractive, because it can be observed with the telescope with M 20 (Trifid Nebula) in the same field of view - but not in the eVscope.
M 22   Sagittarius GC Nice globular cluster, one of the largest ones, larger than M 5
M 23   Sagittarius OC Large open star cluster (nearly moon size)
M 24 Small Sagittarius Cloud Sagittarius SC Part of the Milky Way, too large for the eVscope
M 25   Sagittarius OC A "classical object for binoculars"
M 26   Scutum OC One of the more inconspicuous star clusters
M 27 Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula PN Somewhat faint, but nice
M 28   Sagittarius GC Smaller than the nearby M 22
M 29   Cygnus OC Is considered as small and inconspicuous, and one of the less known Messier objects. It showed only a few stars in my own observation, even in the eVscope.
M 31 Andromeda Galaxy Andromeda G Too large for the eVscope's field of view
M 32   Andromeda G Satellite galaxy of M 31
M 39   Cygnus OC Few stars
M 51 Whirlpool Galaxy Canes Venatici G Nice spiral galaxy with connected satellite galaxy; sky cloudy this time.
M 52   Cassiopeia OC Mid-sized open star cluster
M 53   Coma Berenices GC One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 54   Sagittarius GC The left one of the three globular star clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69. According to Stoyan, it is not a globular star cluster of our galaxy, but belongs to a dwarf galaxy, which is just being "cannibalized" by our galaxy.
M 56   Lyra GC One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 57 Ring Nebula Lyra GN Ring nice to see
M 69   Sagittarius GC Is located farthest to the West of the three globular clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69, small.
M 70   Sagittarius GC Is located in the middle one of the three globular clusters M 54, M 70, and M 69, small. Up to now, only photographed "disturbed".

M 71

  Sagitta GC According to Stoyan, an unusually loose globular star cluster
M 72   Aquarius GC According to Stoyan, one of the more inconspicuous globular star clusters
M 73   Aquarius OC According to Stoyan, one of the more obscure Messier objects, but worth visiting
M 75   Sagittarius GC According to Stoyan, following M 54, the farthest away globular star cluster in Messier's catalogue, which explains its low brightness and size.
M 81 Bode Galaxy Ursa Major G Nice spiral galaxy; the spiral is not very conspicuous in the eVscope
M 82 Cigar Galaxy Ursa Major G Elongated irregular galaxy (cigar), dirsturbed by an encounter with M 81
M 85 + supernova 2020nlb Coma Berenices G Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with the galaxy NGC 4394 in the same field of view of the eVscope; this time faint, but the new supernova 2020nlb (discovered on June 25, 2020) could be seen well.
M 92   Hercules GC Nice globular star cluster, smaller than M 13, but brighter core
M 97 Owl Nebula Ursa Major PN Small green dot with two dark spots
M 101 Pinwheel Galaxy Ursa Major G Spiral galaxy, seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 100, but much larger than both; quite impressive in the eVscope
M 102 Spindle Galaxy Draco G Seen edge-on; shares the name "Spindle Galaxy" with two other galaxies
M 110   Andromeda G Satellite galaxy of M 31
NGC 6445 Crescent Nebula Sagittarius PN Very small in the eVscope
NGC 6543 Cat's Eye Nebula Draco PN Very small in the eVscope
NGC 6741 Phantom Streak Nebula Aquila PN So extremely small in the eVscope that I was not able to find it on the eVscope photo. Neither did the plate solving Website Astrometry.net! But I was able to identify it with the help of Stellarium.
NGC 6818 Little Gem Nebula Sagittarius PN According to Stoyan very small and bright
NGC 6820/23   Vulpecula GE/OC NGC 6820 is a small reflection nebula near the open star cluster NGC 6823. Both are embedded in the large faint emission nebula Sh 2-86. The whole area of nebulosity is often referred to as NGC 6820.
NGC 6822 Barnards Galaxie Sagittarius G According to Stoyan faint and hard to see. This was in fact even with the eVscope the case. But once, I was able to find a faint glow after post-processing...
NGC 6882/5   Vulpecula OS Wide-spread open star cluster, actually NGC 6885, not NGC 6882...
NGC 6888 Crescent Nebula Cygnus GE Faint and better suited to larger telescopes
NGC 6934   Delphinus GC According to Stoyan hard to resolve; it is, however, possible with the eVscope.
NGC 6946 Fireworks Galaxy Cepheus G 40' distant from the open star cluster NGC 6939, too far to see both in the eVscope at once
NGC 6960 Western Veil Nebula Cygnus GN I was able to catch at least a glimpse of NGC 6960 with the eVscope, although all this is far too large for the eVscopes field of view.
NGC 6995 Eastern Veil Nebula Cygnus GN I was able to catch at least a glimpse of NGC 6995 with the eVscope, although all this is far too large for the eVscopes field of view.
NGC 7000 North-America Nebula Cygnus GN Too large for the eVscope, nebula not really recognizable...
NGC 7006   Delphinus GC Small, but also far away for a globular star cluster
NGC 7009 Saturn Nebula Aquarius PN Very small, reminds of the planet Saturn with its "ears"
NGC 7243   Lacerta OC Originally confirmed with a Karkoschka photo; better seen in August 2020
NGC 7317 Stephan's Quintet Pegasus G Part of Stephan's Quintet, a group of small galaxies. In the eVscope it is very small. It is located close to the galaxy NGC 7331.
NGC 7331   Pegasus G Originally faint, but confirmed with a Stoyan drawing; better seen in August 2020
NGC 7479 Superman Galaxy Pegasus G Can be seen well as a barred spiral

G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GE = galactic emission nebula, GR = galactic reflection nebula, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, PN = planetary nebula, SP = star pattern, HII = HII region (emission nebula in other galaxies), SC = star cloud

 

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27.09.2020