Deep Sky Observations with eVscope April 2020

Conditions | Observation Overview | List of Observed Sky Objects | References

Since the end of January 2020, I own an Unistellar eVscope telescope for observing and taking photos of deep sky objects. On this page, I collect information about first observations in April 2020 using the new version of the Unistellar app (version 1.0), which might be of interest to other beginners. The photos that were taken during the observations are shown elsewhere on this site.

In this phase, I visited (and documented here...) the following deep sky objects with the Unistellar eVscope (in alphabetical order):

Notes:

 

Conditions

Sky Region and Objects

In April 2020, I observed the sky area in the south, southwest, and somewhat to the west, but also looked into further directions (Ursa Major, Virgo, Canes Venatici, ...). Therefore, a map does not make much sense here...

Observation Time

The observations in this phase started at the beginning of April 2020. They typically took place shortly after dusk, when it was sufficiently dark for a successful star alignment. Once, I also observed in the early morning.

Observation Location

All observations took place in Mühlhausen/Kraichgau (Germany):

Equipment Used

When observing with the eVscope, I only needed the eVscope and my iPhone.

General Conditions

In general, the sky above Mühlhausen/Kraichgau is "light-polluted" and does not invite you to search for deep sky objects. This is certainly one of the reasons why I found some of the deep sky objects that I wanted to observe only sometimes or not at all. For astro photography, however, light pollution is not as disturbing as for visual observations.

 

Observation Overview

Observation Dates

Date
2020
Observed Objects Observed Objects, Details Remarks Further Remarks
Apr 8 G: M 51, M 63, M 81, M 82, NGC 2403 Order: M 51, M 81, M 82, NGC 2403 Full moon, a lot of noise in the photos New app version 1.0.2, seemed more stable...
Apr 11 C: C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS), C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS)
OC: M 35
G: NGC 2403
Order: C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS), C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS), M 35, NGC 2403 Moon did not disturb Unistellar had called for concerted observation of comet ATLAS, but data download and upload did not work; so I observed for myself...
Apr 15 (M) GN: M 27, M 57
GC: M 56, M 92
Order: M 57, M 56, M 92, M 27 The sky got too bright in the morning Observations in parallel to observing a special constellation of the planets and the moon
Apr 19 G: M 51, M 101, M 108, NGC 4236, NGC 4631
PN: M 97
Order: M 51, M 101, NGC 4236, NGC 4631, M 101, NGC 4236, M 97, M 108 Observed from about 10 p.m. to shortly before midnight Four nights before new moon; all photos regrettably not quite sharp...
Apr 21 GC: M 3, M 53
G: IC 2574, M 51, M 63, M 64, M 81, M 82, M 94, M 101, M 102, M 106, M 108, M 109, NGC 4236, NGC 4244, NGC 4449, NGC 4490/85, NGC 4559, NGC 4565, NGC 4631, NGC 5005
PN: M 97
DS: M 40
Order: M 108, M 97, M 40, IC 2574, M 81, M 82, NGC 4236, M 101, M 102, M 51, NGC 4631, NGC 4559, NGC 4565, NGC 5005, NGC 4490, NGC 4449, NGC 4244, M 94, M 63, M 106, M 109, M 3, M 53, M 64 Observed from about 9:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. the next day Two nights before new moon; used the Bahtinov mask before observing to focus the eVscope
Apr 22 G: M 51, M 60, M 65, M 66, M 84, M 85, M 86, M 95, M 96, M 101, M 104, M 106, NGC 4565, NGC 4665
PN: NGC 40
About 9:30 p.m.: NGC 40 (Bow Tie Nebula)
From about 10:15 p.m. on: M 65/66, M 105, M 95, M 96, M 104, M 86/84, M 85, M 60, M 101, M 51, NGC 4665, NGC 4565
Observed from about 9:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.

For the first time, I took rectangular photos without overlay (app version 1.0.3)

Apr 23 G: M 65, M 66, M 95, M 96, NGC 2903, NGC 3628 Order: NGC 2903 (very faint), M 66 and M 65 together, M 95, M 96, NGC 3628 Observed from about 8:00 p.m. (with dinner break) to 11:00 p.m. Parallel observation eVscope versus C8 (except for NGC 3628)

Bold: First observation during this observation period; G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GN = galactic nebula, PN = planetary nebula, P = star pattern, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, SN = supernova

 

List of Observed Sky Objects

Object details can be obtained via the links to the relevant deep sky objects.

DSO Details
Name Constellation Type Remarks
C/2017 T2 C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS) --- C The comet can be recognized as such. Better to see than in March.
C/2019 Y4 C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS) --- C The comet can be recognized as such. Better to see than in March.
IC 2574   Ursa Major G Very faint spiral galaxy, hard for the eVscope
M 3   Canes Venatici GC Nice globular cluster, one of the larger ones
M 27   Vulpecula GN Already too bright in the morning, nebula hardly to see
M 35   Gemini OC Large and nice open star cluster
M 40 Winnecke 4 Ursa Major DS Optical double star; nearby are three small galaxies (NGC 4284, NGC 4290, PGC 39934)
M 51 Whirlpool Galaxy Canes Venatici G Nice spiral galaxy with connected satellite galaxy
M 53  

Coma Berenices

GC One of the smaller globular star clusters
M 56   Lyra GC Already too bright in the morning
M 57 Ring Nebula Lyra GN Nice view of the ring
M 60   Virgo G Elliptical galaxy with satellite NGC 4647 (spiral galaxy)
M 63 Sunflower Galaxy Canes Venatici G Nice, elongated spiral galaxy, somewhat larger
M 64 Black Eye Galaxy Coma Berenices G Impressive spiral galaxy with unique look, somewhat larger
M 65   Leo G Thin, elongated spiral galaxy, spiral hard to see; part of the Leo triplet (with M 66 and NGC 3623; with M 66 just about into the field of view of the eVscope
M 66   Leo G Elongated spiral galaxy, spiral visible; part of the Leo triplet (with M 65 and NGC 3628; with M 65 just about into the field of view of the eVscope
M 81 Bode Galaxy Ursa Major G Nice spiral galaxy; the spiral is not very conspicuous in the eVscope
M 82 Cigar Galaxy Ursa Major G Elongated irregular galaxy (cigar), dirsturbed by an encounter with M 81
M 84   Virgo G Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with M 86 in the eVscope's field of view (+ NGC 4387 and a bit of NGC 4402)
M 85   Coma Berenices G Elliptical galaxy that can be seen together with the galaxy NGC 4394 in the same field of view of the eVscope
M 86   Virgo G Observed alone and together with M 84 in the field of view (+ NGC 4387 and a bit of NGC 4402)
M 92   Hercules GC Already too bright in the morning
M 94   Canes Venatici G Small spiral galaxy, the spiral appears more like a nebula
M 95   Leo G Small spiral galaxy, the spiral appears more like a nebula
M 96   Leo G Small barred spiral galaxy, relatively faint, but the bar is visible. Forms a pair with M 96, but too far away for the eVscope (40').
M 97   Ursa Major PN Small green dot with two dark spots
M 101 Pinwheel Galaxy Ursa Major G Spiral galaxy, seen face-on, similar to M 99 and M 100, but much larger than both; quite impressive in the eVscope
M 102   Draco G Seen edge-on; shares the name "Spindle Galaxy" with two other galaxies
M 104 Sombrero Galaxy Virgo G Spiral galaxy, seen nearly edge-on; the dust ring and the bright nucleus led to the name; very impressive in the eVscope.
M 106   Canes Venatici G Larger and bright spiral galaxy with bright core
M 108   Ursa Major G Barred spiral galaxy, nearly seen edge-on
M 109   Ursa Major G Barred spiral galaxy, the bar is easily recognized in the eVscope
NGC 40 Bow Tie Nebula Cepheus PN Has a white dwarf as central star, the nebula looks violet in the eVscope.
NGC 2403   Camelopardis G Spiral galaxie, regarded as one of the best galaxies for small telescopes; unclear why Messier overlooked it; fairly impressive in the eVscope. Not as good as in March.
NGC 2903   Leo G One of the brighter spiral galaxies; unclear why Messier missed it..
NGC 3628   Leo G Spiral galaxy seen edge-on; it forms a conspicuous group with M 65 and M 66, the Leo Triplet.
NGC 4236   Draco G Barred spiral galaxy, very faint
NGC 4244 Silver Needle Galaxy Canes Venatici G Spiral galaxy, very thin and long, seen edge-on
NGC 4284/4290 See M 40 Ursa Major G Two small galaxies in the vicinity of the optical double star M 40
NGC 4449   Canes Venatici G Irregular galaxy
NGC 4490/85 Cocoon Galaxies Canes Venatici G Distorted spiral galaxies, which interact with one another
NGC 4559   Coma Berenices G Spiral galaxy
NGC 4565   Coma Berenices G One of the most prominent and famous edge-on spiral galaxies in the sky
NGC 4631 Whale Galaxy Canes Venatici G Spiral galaxy, seen edge-on; above it, there is a companion, the elliptical dwarf galaxy NGC 4627.
NGC 4665     G Spiral galaxy
NGC 5005   Canes Venatici G Oblique spiral galaxy with bright core

G = galaxy, OC = open star cluster, GC = globular star cluster, GE = galactic emission nebula, GR = galactic reflection nebula, DN = dark nebula, C = comet, PN = planetary nebula, SP = star pattern, HII = HII region (emission nebula in other galaxies)

 

References

Books

On this Website

 

An den Anfang   Homepage  

gerd (at) waloszek (dot) de

About me
made by walodesign on a mac!
27.09.2020